needs more demons?

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Entries Tagged as 'j-title'

Adam Roberts: Jack Glass: The Story of a Murderer

10 May 2013 · No Comments

There was a lot I appreciated about Robert’s elegantly crafted Jack Glass, but I definitely didn’t think it succeeded at everything it set out to do.
The middle section of the novel, for instance, offers a classically structured whodunnit and — skirting spoilers — I think Roberts is trying to get the reader so far in [...]

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Tags: j-title · r-author · science fiction

Beth Ann Bauman: Jersey Angel

13 Aug 2012 · No Comments

Jersey Angel takes a unusually candid look at teen promiscuity for a young adult novel. At the outset, narrator Angel Cassonetti is pretty much ruled by her id. She has a see/want/take attitude towards food (this might be a tough book for dieters) and boys. She sort of works, but selects her employment partly based [...]

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Tags: b-author · j-title · young adult

Michael Flynn: The January Dancer

04 Jun 2010 · No Comments

The January Dancer impressed me on many levels. Its milieu has a vividness that reminded me of Simmons’ Hyperion, Wolfe’s Book of the New Sun and Banks’ Culture novels, and, as those works do, Flynn’s tackles some familiar sci-fi concepts with literary ambition substantially beyond escapism. Flynn’s world-building is especially impressive — he takes a [...]

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Tags: f-author · j-title · science fiction

David Wong: John Dies at the End

18 Nov 2009 · No Comments

If you take its core plot at face-value, John Dies at the End is at least superficially a xenophobic horror story in the Cthulhu mythos mode. Wong gives his Big Nasties different names from Cthulhu and his crowd, but he specifically borrows a key concept from Lovecraft’s “From Beyond” — if you do something special [...]

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Tags: horror · j-title · p-author · w-author

Jerome Charyn: Johnny One-Eye

24 Dec 2008 · No Comments

I appreciated the craft that went into Johnny One-Eye, but I didn’t enjoy it very much. It’s not the sort of book I usually read, but I picked it up hoping it might be something of a cross between HBO’s John Adams and Barth’s The Sot-Weed Factor. It’s much more like the former than [...]

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Tags: c-author · historical · j-title

Charles Stross: The Jennifer Morgue

07 May 2008 · No Comments

I think The Jennifer Morgue is the most successful of Charles Stross’s novels that I’ve read so far. It’s a mutant melange of genres including xenophobic Lovecraftian horror/fantasy; Dilbert-esque, geek-celebrating cubicle rat satire; modern techno espionage thriller; and old-school shaken-not-stirred James Bondage — all served up with a hefty post-modern literary twist and dark [...]

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Tags: fantasy · horror · j-title · s-author · thriller

Susanna Clarke: Jonathan Strange & Mr Norrell

01 Feb 2008 · No Comments

There is so much that’s good, even excellent, about this novel that I feel a little churlish for stating that the primary impression it left me with was one of disappointment, but that is the case, and the disappointment doesn’t arise solely as a consequence of the many accolades and awards heaped on it (although [...]

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Tags: c-author · fantasy · historical · j-title

Julie Powell: Julie & Julia

16 Dec 2006 · No Comments

I read this at least partly to challenge my own preconceptions about what kind of books I read. This is a non-cookbook about cooking — worse, French cooking, although I didn’t realize quite how meat-intensive it would actually be.
But it’s also a book about a crazy challenge — specifically, cooking every recipe in Julia [...]

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Tags: autobiography · food · j-title · p-author